1960s Cannery Model Discovered on Third Floor

While recently poking around the vacant third floor of FASCU’s new home at the Cannery, we came across a curious relic nestled into one corner of a seldom-used conference room. An architectural model of the Cannery, which we’ve discovered to be the actual model used during the structure’s 1960s renovation, has apparently survived the last 46 years as a quiet resident of the historical building. We actually found two photos placing the model’s creation in 1965 — first, in the photograph above, then-owner of the Cannery Leonard Martin poses with the model in the gutted-out interior of what would eventually become the current Cannery interior. A second photo (below) betrays what actually survives of the original 1907 Cannery structure: its four outer walls!

We think it’s pretty extraordinary that this model has survived over four decades, complete with the miniature Matchbox cars that can be seen in the ’60s photos. Too bad the empty, toll-free curb parking didn’t translate to the modern day…

Portrait Sculpture Time-Lapse

Last semester, we set up a camera for three consecutive sessions in Lawrence Noble’s Portrait Sculpture (FASCU 345) class to see how a piece comes together in the span of just a few minutes. Check out student Shadoe Delgado (with cameos by Gianna Dispenza, Richard Thoms, and others) as he sculpts model Alexei Setian at FASCU’s Cannery studio. The four-minute video represents over 20 hours of sculpting!

Many thanks to Brad Robertson at Cyber Campus for editing the piece and composing the music!!

Student Sculpture Proposals for FASCU Office

With a new set of lovely French doors recently installed in the FASCU offices at the Cannery, an unexpected blank space was created to the left of the entryway — and what better way to fill it than with a custom relief sculpture created by a FASCU student?!

At the request of Sculpture Chair Lawrence Noble, instructor Scott Donahue (Relief: Expression & Interpretation) set his students to work proposing several different possibilities for the space, which we are showcasing below. The students were instructed to carefully consider the space surrounding the relief (15th century English oak paneling) and the context of its location.

After much deliberation, a fantasy-themed Victorian elephant relief by student Seok Don Choi has been chosen to occupy the void framed by the centuries-old paneling, and is the final piece depicted below. We’ll update this story once the final relief is in place!

Many thanks to the students of FASCU 645 for their dedication and wonderful proposals!

PROPOSALS:

Jihoon Choi chose to incorporate AAU school iconography and an old English font to convey the tone and purpose of the space:

Luotian Zhang incorporated several facial profiles into his design, each expressing a different emotion:

Welat Binavi took a more non-literal approach with a rather pleasant color-scheme:

Wenquing Cui took inspiration from the old walls to create an Egyptian hieroglyphic motif:

wenquing

Finally, Seok Don Choi’s fantastical Victorian elephant proposal was selected for the space, which was supported by his stunning sketches and 3D mock-up:

Seok Don at work on the relief:

UPDATE: Check out the final work installed below — we think it’s absolutely fantastic!!

Finished elephant relief by Seok-don Choi

FASCU Featured in Latest Sculpture Review Magazine

Sculpture ReviewAcademy of Art University School of Fine Art: Sculpture students and faculty will be featured prominently in the upcoming issue of Sculpture Review, which is now on its way to subscribers! If you’d like to purchase a subscription with the National Sculpture Society (highly recommended!), head on over to their subscription page!

Academy of Art University Sculpture Chair Lawrence Noble

“When I heard the words ‘classical figurative sculpture’, I thought this is a place that really interests me,” says AAU Sculpture Chair Lawrence Noble, recalling his first reaction to the possibility of heading up the university’s sculpture department at the Cannery in San Francisco. “It just hit me right where I live in terms of what my work symbolized and what a wonderful opportunity it would be to explain the 40 year adventure I’d been on.”

Lawrence Noble, who built a solid reputation as a graphic designer and movie poster illustrator in the 1970s, launched his acclaimed sculptural career in 1980 when a chance viewing of The Empire Strikes Back inspired the artist to try his hand at sculpture. “It was the character Yoda,” says Noble. “After I saw him, I just felt this need to express the inspiration into three dimensions, not my usual two. Some things just exceed our ability to completely understand them.”

Since that brush with the Force three decades ago, Noble has evolved into a master sculptor, counting bronze installations of Civil War General Philip H. Sheridan in Chicago, The California Firefighters’ Memorial, the San Bernardino County Peace Officers’ Memorial, and a new life-size Yoda for Lucasfilm’s Presidio headquarters in San Francisco among his many public commissions since 1990.

I recently sat down with Lawrence at the Cannery campus to discuss his new role as Sculpture Chair at Academy of Art University:

How did you find AAU, or how did AAU find you?

I was recommended to AAU by Eugene Daub, who is one of America’s foremost sculptors. We have a good relationship, respect for each other’s work, and we’ve known each other for decades. So I felt good that he felt good enough about me to recommend me here.

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FASCU at the Cannery

Welcome!

2012 was an exciting year for students enrolled at Academy of Arts University’s School of Sculpture, with a number of classes moving from the 410 Bush campus in the city out to the scenic bayside locale at San Francisco’s historic Cannery building at Fisherman’s Wharf. The Cannery, an earthquake retrofitted 1907 structure that boasts classic architecture and fantastic high-ceiling studio interiors, is the perfect venue to inspire students looking to explore the sculptural arts or refine and enhance their artistic skills. The Cannery is also host to several AAU galleries that are open to the public and well-positioned to showcase our students’ work to the many travelers that frequent this landmark location.



Getting Oriented

As a way of introducing AAU’s new Cannery facility to both current and potential students who haven’t shuttled out to the wharf yet, we’ve posted a handful of photos above to give you a sense of what you’ll find when you visit us, including some peeks into the galleries and classrooms below. We hope you’ll stop by to visit us for a more thorough look at our facility and the wonderful amenities this new location has to offer (seriously, stay for lunch – there are TONS of great eateries!).



Who’s Where?

While many AAU Sculpture courses have moved out to the Cannery, some still currently reside at the original 410 Bush location. Here’s a breakdown of the FASCU (Fine Art – Sculpture) classes currently offered at each campus (these are the current Spring 2013 courses and are subject to change):

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